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Big Brother

X-Men comes to home video: Tyler Mane talks about his transition from pro wrestling to playing Sabretooth in the film 
By Andy Argyrakis

X-Men The Movie hits home video and DVD on November 21 bringing the Marvel comic book series to life.  The film translates the mutant like book characters onto television screens, featuring a cast of today's most prominent actors, like an Ian McKellen, Ray Park, Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Halle Berry and Tyler Mane. 

In particular, Mane is a hard actor to miss in the film while playing the role of Sabretooth.  He stands at  6'10 and weighs in at 275 pounds.  This giant took his first major acting role in X-Men after a career in pro-wrestling, including a successful run in World Championship Wrestling.  In the wake of the video release, here's what Mane had to say about his transition from the wrestling ring to the set of the blockbuster film.

AA:  What was it like to walk on the set everyday amongst all of the amazing structures?

Mane:  It's always cool to see these million dollar sets and then see them getting blown up and destroyed.  The designers really made the set come to life and it was great to see all of the characters come together on it and act out the fight scenes. 

AA:  Was getting involved in an action movie like X-Men something you had planned for a while?

Mane:  It's always been a job that I've wanted to do. The money is great and it's a lot of fun, but most importantly, I wanted a job where I didn't have to sit behind a desk all of the time.  With my size, a fighting related role worked well. 

AA:  What was it like stepping out of the wrestling ring and into a movie studio?

Mane:  It was a lot different, but wrestling was like a stepping stone into acting.  In wrestling, there is a lot of traveling involved, but you only participate in 10-20 minutes of non-stop action at night when you fight.  On a movie set, one particular day may have 4
hours of just getting makeup on, so you really have to be patient.

AA:  What do you think of the current state of wrestling?

Mane:  I think that they should get back to the wrestling action and get rid of the scantily clad women.  I mean young kids watch wrestling and everything they see on the screen cycles back to their brains.  Wrestlers have done just about everything they can do in the ring, so that's why storylines are such a big part of the shows now.

AA:  What type of advice would you give to young people that want to get into professional wrestling?

Mane:  First of all, some people are made to be in it and others are just not the right size for it.  Wrestling is something you have to be a certain size for.  Another important part of wrestling is how you can be marketed.  You have to be able to make a good
character so you can get noticed.

AA:  How about for those going into acting?

Mane:  That's more of a matter of being discovered.  It's really about being in the right place at the right time.  You have to be a go getter with that because nothing is going to happen if you're not going out getting the experience you need.  That business will always be a struggle when starting out and things won't come easy.  But it's like that in any aspect of life, so that just means to really go for it.

AA:  Will you continue with acting roles?

Mane:  When it became public knowledge that I was working in X-Men, I got some other film offers, so for now it is something I will continue.

AA:  What have you found most fulfilling about all of the fame you've found throughout your various roles?

Mane:  My wife and kids are really what I do all of this for.  Without them and their support, I would have no motivation to get out there and work hard.  They are more important then anything I've accomplished in my public life. 
 

 
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