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Evan and Jaron in Concert
St. Louis, MO
By John Wehrle

With the whirlwind success of their latest CD, Evan and Jaron Lowenstein are traveling all around the country playing mid-sized venues. These identical twins from Atlanta owe most of their success to the single "Crazy for this Girl."  The single climbed to number one for several weeks in the first part
of 2001.

This particular night they were playing at The Pageant, a new nightclub found in a trendy area of St. Louis, MO.  The night started with local opening act Gorgeous Nick Wolfe, whose blend of hip-hop, reggae, and soul prepared the crowd for the next band.

Next on the plate was Athenaeum.  This band is best known for their 1998 signature song, "What I didn't know."  It's clear the band is trying to break through with another ditty of equal proportion.  The four-piece band from North Carolina belted out 35 minutes of clever melodies and semi-tight
vocals.  The only drawback was the occasional pitch problem.

Finally, the lights dimmed down to red police sirens screaming from both ends of the stage. Smoke filled the stage and musicians began walking to don their instruments.  As the music started it was clear, the crowd was being whisked away to a new level of performance.  It was time for Evan and Jaron to enter the stage.  They were accompanied by a four-piece band that led the way.

The journey started with "Outerspace", the first song off their self-titled CD.  Midway through the song, there was an interruption of the nursery rhyme, "Down Down Baby."  It was clear that many of the attendees were only familiar with the two radio singles off the CD. E&J seemed to realize this, and decided to win the crowd from the start with the inclusion of something the audience knew.

The fourth song of the set was the current radio hit, "From my Head to my Heart."  The song was introduced with a funny dialogue from Kasey Casum who took a request and dedication for a girl who was in love with two twin boys who were always on the road.  The first four songs were played without a
break between them.

Midway through the set, Jaron and band left the stage to allow Evan a solo performance on "The Distance."  This was a perfect break from the raging guitars and drums.  The only drawback was the loudness of the college-aged kids who had found the bar.

The crowd varied in age from the 20 something college crowd to the middle school girls who found the "cute guys" on the same shelf as N'Sync or Backstreet Boys.  During the show, Jaron took a crack at the audience: "We have the babysitters here and the kids over here."

The set continued with songs off with melodic songs from their CD and the occasional quip from Jaron to the audience.  They showed a sense of humor and a touch of realness.  These were down-to-earth rock stars.

Towards the end of the set, Jaron turned to the crowd and said, "This song is your song." On that note, the twins performed "Crazy for This Girl."  It was the crowd favorite, but only because of its recognizable melody.  It certainly wasn't the strongest song of the night.  After one more song was played, the boys departed the stage to prepare for part two of the evening.

The encore began with a country version of AC/DC's, "(You Shook Me) All Night Long" and ended with "Make it Better."  The lyrics were fitting for the end of a concert: "It's been real, but it's time to go home, time to change back to the clothes that I own."

Overall, the show was very captivating.  Evan and Jaron are two young crooners who create beautiful vocal harmonies and endless sing-along tunes. The twins were effective with the time allotted.  They sang nearly all the songs on their CD, while sharing their charm and dry sense of humor with the crowd.

In a pre-show interview, Evan Lowenstein, confessed, "I love to play in front of a live audience, about five nights a week.  In the studio, it's like you’re an actor playing a part, but live every night is a different
thing."

For those of you who don't know, Evan and Jaron come from an orthodox Jewish background.  These values are reflected in their clean lyrics and scheduling habits.  Because of the Jewish Sabbath, Evan and Jaron have a clause in their contract that they will not play shows or do interviews from sundown
on Friday to sundown on Saturday.  For this reason, they turned down an opening slot for Oasis in 1996.

"Automatically we said we can't do it," says Evan. "And the day before the show, they canceled. Can you imagine if we had given up everything we believed for that one show? How stupid we would have looked?"

While reflecting on how their faith plays a part in their music, Evan Lowenstein said,  "The songs reflect our lives.  We are good guys but we like to have fun too."  He then pointed out the lyrics from "Done Hanging on Maybe."  The lyric goes, "Last night I heard the sweetest words, but if I wasn't drinking, I might have remembered more of what she said."

Evan says he has a wide range of musical influences : Elvis Costello, Bruce Springstein, Bob Dylan, and Metallica.  When asked about Christian music, he said, "We love Michael W. Smith, and we get told that we sound like Jars of Clay all the time."

Their recording has produced two radio songs and has amazing radio potential.  They have compiled an album of sophisticated love songs and the ever so often thought provoking lyrics.
 

 

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