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Lindsey Kane Interview
 
When I was younger, okay when I was much younger, there used to be a group called Lobo that had a line in their hit song that said, "Me and you and a dog named Boo." That song appropriately describes the life of Lindsey Kane, an Austin, Texas, based singer/songwriter. After winning a songwriting contest at Dallas radio station KLTY in 2003, Kane committed her life to full time music ministry. Her constant companion is her border collie Boo.
 
"Satisfied," the title track from her debut album, has received radio play in both southern and northern USA despite that being a tough nut to crack for an Indie artist. In addition, Kane is in demand as a performer at a variety of venues throughout most of the southern states, California and New York City. 
 
Although she took to music seriously at age seventeen, it was just prior to entering her song in the KLTY contest that she said, "I finally felt I was so into my shoes as far as being the person God wanted me to be and the artist He wanted me to be. I started writing a bunch of songs. He was giving me tons and tons of songs. God stirred me inside."
 
Chuck Finney, National Program Director for Salem Fish Music Stations said, "Lindsey's fresh, earthy, worshipful sound totally captivated our judges in the first 94.9 KLTY Rising Star Talent Competition in 2003. She has an awesome sound and presence!"
 
"I was very ready to put my heart down on a new CD. I called it Satisfied because I felt that (described) my heart at the time. I am satisfied in Christ and who He has made me to be. That is where my heart is on the record," said Kane.
 
The prize for winning KLTY's songwriting contest was studio time to record three songs. The experience inspired her to create her CD. "I began raising (financial) support for my new project. It all came together. It was so beyond me and out of my hands I knew it was God. I went ahead and recorded nine more songs to finish the record," she said.
 
Long before there was the acetate disc Satisfied Lindsey wrote a chart stopper called "How Do I Become A Christian?" She started to tell me about the song she wrote as an eight year old budding star and then had to be cajoled into telling me more. "I was in my bed and I started writing on this sheet of paper. If you can even count it as a song, it was something I had made up in my head," Kane said. As she was preparing to sing the song she made me promise, "You can't judge my voice on the following performance." Fingers crossed behind my back I agreed.
 
     "How do I become a Christian?
      How do I open my heart and let him in?
      How do I become a Christian?
      I just open my heart and He'll come in."
 
In her southern drawl she cooed, "Isn't that cute."
 
By the time she hit seventeen, "I just decided that I wanted to learn how to play the guitar. I went home and picked up the old classical guitar my mom had in the 'sixties. I bought a chord book and started teaching myself how to play. Within a week of learning some very basic chords I had written my first song. That's how I realized this was bigger than me and this was a God thing. It's just hilarious that God would use me to write songs." 
 
Although Lindsey Kane's modesty is genuine, her perception of her songwriting ability is not accurate. She pens good tunes. The songs "Satisfied" and "Let Me Have You" have great melodies that encourage the listener to play backup vocalist. "Satisfied" is a little lighter up tempo song while "Let Me Have You" features heavier drumbeats. 
 
"I Don't Know" features some great guitar licks by Kendall Combes and Pat Malone's deep grooves on bass guitar. The surrealistic vibes accent the lyrics that speak to the confusion of a person trying to make sense out of chaos.
 
In talking about "I Don't Know" Kane said, "If you just read the lyrics and don't listen to the melody, it sounds like a confused person saying Lord I do not know what is going on. I am not doing anything right. That was just my heart I was going through some trials and saying God I don't know which way is up but I know you are up there. I don't know which song to sing but I know you are going to be listening. It was my heart saying Lord I don't really know that much but I know that I love you and I know that you are good. You are worthy of praise."
  
Kane also demonstrates the ability to both write and sing gentle introspective prayers such as "The Valley." It serves as a reminder that although Christians are not exempt from deep valleys and difficult times we do have a savior that walks with us every step of the way.
 
About "The Valley" Kane said, "OOOhhh this is a good one. I love this song. About a year and one half ago I started to realize that He was sovereign. You hear it your whole life but I started believing He was sovereign and in control. I was definitely in the valley, where you struggle in your faith to understand what God is doing. You feel alone. You don't have that joy and peace. One night I was praying and asking God to take me out of this valley. I don't want to be here anymore. I don't want to suffer. It was almost like he spoke to my heart. (He said) 'Look beside you. I just want to sit down with you. I want to join you, love on you and teach you about myself.' The chorus is very simple. It says, 'Jesus where would I be without your sovereignty?" She says that is where her trust in God deepened and she no longer felt alone. 
 
"What Were You Thinking" is an insightful song and the lyrics represent a maturing in Kane as both an artist and person. Kane said, "When I look at whom I was a couple of years ago and who I am now it is just like any journey of faith, God continues to change you and grow you. The songwriting is entirely different. It is a deeper level. It is more real. It is bolder. It's not fluff and I'm not trying to tickle anyone's ears. I'm being honest with what is going on in my heart because if I'm feeling it I am sure that tons of other Christians are. It is just good to have that down in music." 
 
Concerning the lyrics for "What Were You Thinking?" Kane said, "It hit me that I am always sharing my thoughts with the Lord. I always tell Him what I am thinking but rarely do I ask Him what He is thinking. I never just sit in prayer and ask God what's on your mind? What makes your heart beat? I was wondering what Jesus was thinking when He was walking along and saw the tree that became the wood for the cross that He would die on. I thought, He knows everything and through Him everything is made. I started thinking about when God created the men that would crucify Jesus and wondered what God was thinking at that time."
 
She also had this to say about the lyrics for "What Were You Thinking?" "The whole heartbeat behind the song is, 'I don't really understand Your thoughts because You are perfect and You are God. You see everything. I don't understand what you are thinking.' It is a revelation of God's sovereignty."
 
Austin is a long way from the west Texas town of Midland where Lindsey grew up. Her father had President Bush in his Bible study. Laura Bush was the church librarian. Back then, Lindsay Kane was an eight-year-old girl sitting on a bed writing her first song and thinking about sports. Today, she is writing songs with emotive lyrics and great melodies. With a heavy tour schedule and preparing for the fall release of an album with a little edgier flavor Lindsey Kane's future looks bright.
 
www.lindseykane.com
     
 
By Joe Montague, exclusive rights reserved
 
Joe Montague is an internationally published journalist / photographer. His ministry is dedicated to the memory of his late son Kent David Montague who went to heaven at the age of 18. All copyright and distribution rights remain the property of Joe Montague. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
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