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Single Serving 
By psychologist, Dr. Bruce L. Thiessen, aka Dr BLT 
Band: The Beatles 
Song: Ticket to Ride 

I think I'm gonna be sad, 
I think it's today, yeah. 
The girl that's driving me mad 
Is going away. 

If you’re going to say good-bye do somebody you love, do it in style, like John Denver did with this song: 

Leavin’ on a Jetplane 
Dr BLT covers John Denver, from the forthcoming CD, 7 Tease 
http://www.drblt.net/music/jetp.mp3 
…Or like the Beatles did with 
Ticket to Ride 
Dr BLT covers the Beatles, from the forthcoming CD, The BLT in Beatles 
http://www.drblt.net/music/ticket2ride.mp3 

She's got a ticket to ride, 
She's got a ticket to ride, 
She's got a ticket to ride, 
But she don't care. 

Having a “ticket to ride,” is one thing, but “she don’t care,” and that’s the part that really hurts.  The Beatles take the girl-leaves-boy theme some may consider hackneyed and put an angle on it that makes it fresh and new again.  

"Ticket to Ride" offers something many popular songs of today are bereft of: A distinctive melody line.  The melody is infectious and inviting, so the listener hops on board without even giving the song a second thought.   

She said that living with me 
Is bringing her down yeah. 
For she would never be free 
When I was around. 

What a feeling, to know that you are actually a burden and a barrier to someone you love, a liability, and not an asset.  Love is always a gamble.  We want to be loved by those whom we love.  It starts in childhood during a natural process of interaction psychologists refer to as mirroring.  In mirroring the infant displays distinct facial expressions and corresponding body language that requires a particular type of response on the part of the caretaker.   

If a baby smiles, the baby instinctively wants the mother to smile back, or to respond in some type of affirming manner.  If a baby cries, it wants the mother to respond in kind.  To ignore a baby, or to scold a baby for trying to communicate in this way, is to respond in a way that could be detrimental and impinge upon the progression of a natural developmental stage.

When we grow up, we also feel insecure if the object of our love and desire fails to reciprocate our expressions of joy, sorrow, laughter, love and the like.  If our caretaker(s), being so narcissistically wrapped up in their own personal issues, are unable to respond to our needs as infants, we develop what is known as narcissistic injury.  This intensifies how we will react as adults in relationships that we seek out for the purpose of intimacy.  

I don't know why she's ridin' so high, 
She ought to think twice, 
She ought to do right by me. 
Before she gets to saying goodbye, 
She ought to think twice, 
She ought to do right by me. 

When the object of one’s interest, desire, and affection does not respond in kind, we feel rejected and rejection can be manifested in myriad ways, depending on one’s level of emotional stability.  The movie Fatal Attraction portrays the very example of just how ugly things can go when an already unstable person is confronted with personal rejection.  The rejected party can wish, pine and even attempt to “ought” or “guilt” the rejecter into reciprocating, but if a person has truly already checked out of a relationship, winning the person back, will take much more than guilt, and, in most cases, the outcome of the relationship is already outside of the rejected party’s control.   

I think I'm gonna' be sad, 
I think it's today yeah. 
The girl that's driving me mad 
Is going away, yeah. 

She's got a ticket to ride, 
She's got a ticket to ride, 
She's got a ticket to ride, 
But she don't care. 

The song is a little repetitive, but then again, so is the haunting thoughts and emotions that take the rejected person for a ride on the downside of an emotional roller coaster.  Saying good-bye, whether you do it in style like John Denver or the Beatles did with their respective good-bye songs, or whether you do it without any modicum of style or grace, is exceedingly difficult, especially for the one being abandoned.  And, for the rejected party, the following is the dreadful conclusion that is hardest of all to abide:

My baby don't care, my baby don't care. 
My baby don't care, my baby don't care. 
My baby don't care, my baby don't care. 

Ouch! 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
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