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Shades of a Shadow
Artist: Omar Domkus
Label: Independent (omardomkus.com)
Time: 15 tracks/51:13 min.

Shades of a Shadow by Omar Domkus is the perfect album for those that are looking for something eclectically different that doesn't slide into "weird, clanging noise" territory.  Domkus is probably best known as the bass player for Scaterd Few back in their heyday. He has participated in a few projects through the years ­ including working with HR of Bad Brains and Randy Stonehill (bet you never thought you would see those two names in the same sentence) ­ but this is his first solo outing.

While Domkus shows off some great skill on this album, the focus here is on contemplation and atmosphere instead of technical ability.  Vocals and a wide range of instruments are found throughout the entire CD.  In fact, many songs like "Tiananmen Square" and "Little Man" are pretty much full-blown alternative rock songs.  Well, alternative in an ethereal and vibey way - but they do add a new dimension just as you are digging into the bass guitar-focused groove of the previous tracks.  

Percussion throughout the album tends to be of the tribal/world music variety ­ for the most part sounding like smaller hand drums when present.  They add to atmosphere perfectly.  In fact, I can't think a single instrument that sounds out of place ­ they all fit perfectly in with the mood on this disc.

If you have heard Jawboneofanass by Scaterd Few, then you have somewhat of an idea of the style of bass guitar playing featured here. Domkus has obviously grown since then, but the core of what he added to that album is very present here.

If you are looking for bland, flavor of the month pop-star wannabes, keep moving. If you want music with depth and soul, perfect for a monk-like session of meditation ­ grab a good pair of headphones and sink in to this album.

By Matt Crosslin (09-20-2010)


 
 
 
 

 
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